Welcome

Thanks for taking the time to visit my blog. It's a journal of sorts. It gives me a place to show my work-in-progress for my painting and photography. Comments are welcome --- add one at the end of an entry or email me at BarbBlumer@gmail.com.

Thanks for visiting.

Friday, October 22, 2010

Paintings from the Lake - Dappled Path

Dappled Path
8 x 10
Oil on Masonite

I started this painting en plein air and finished it recently.  It is now on its way to our guest who selected it.   It is a path in Penn Yan at the head of the Outlet Trail.  I tried to be very loose.  I had seen a demo by a painter using a very long bristled brush to do a landscape so that it didn't allow you to get too tight.  So, I bought a couple of the brushes he recommended and dabbed away.  I like the effect. 

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Paintings from the Lake - Keuka Lake with Vineyards

Keuka Lake with Vineyards
8 x 10
Oil on Masonite

Early on, this painting was chosen from the grid.  I had fun framing it and delivering it to its new home last month.  It has really worked for me, as a process, to have "the grid" as a project, to paint these summer studies, knowing that I will be giving them away.  I have learned that it seems strange to others, but to me, it is very motivating and freeing. In this painting, I worked on how to create lots of layers in the landscape, starting with the posts of the vineyards in the foreground to the hills behind the lake in the far distance.

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Paintings from the Lake - The Grid

Paintings from the Lake  - The Grid

If you recall, I had a painting goal last summer which was to fill up the grid in the guest room with 8 x 10 paintings; and, then to let our guests choose which one they would like to have.

Here's how the grid looked at the end of the summer.  I was two short of my goal, but still pretty good, considering how busy our summer was and how little painting I did.

B

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Transition Time

 9 x 12 Oil on Masonite

Time and time again,  I learn that if you let go of something, then something new and more fulfilling will arrive in its place.  As with most transitions, when you get to the other side, they are actually freeing.

I have finally decided to let go of my jewelry business so that I have the time to do other things I love, like painting and food blogging.  This coming weekend I am having a big blowout sale of all of my beads, displays, tools, signage, etc. 

I have dismantled my jewelry workshop and taken everything downtown to a temporary location in Connor's empty space at the corner of Cedar and Market Street (where Tru Office Supply was). 

My doors will be open to anyone who wants to buy.  It coincides with the Apartment Tour to support the Arts on this coming Sunday.  Be sure to email me, or call, if you want to arrange to make an appointment to buy.  Or just stop by!


In the meantime, I am going to post the paintings I am in the process of completing. 

This is one I think I am almost done with.  I started it during the summer and recently added color to the pitcher and the yellow flower.  I've put it in a frame and have been looking at it for a week or so now.  I see a few things to touch up, but it just needs a good name.  Suggestions are welcome.

Unlike other paintings, I did an underpainting for this one.  I did the underpainting fairly quickly, in one session, on the Lin's porch.  Marty Poole had showed me how to do an underpainting in a very loose way during the workshop I took with him back in June, so I wanted to try out the technique.  I used a new color:  Van Dyke brown.  You apply the paint with a brush on a white surface, starting with straight color for the darks, adding solvent to lighten the paint for a range of tones, and then wiping away the lightest, highlighted areas with a rag.  It was helpful to solve most of the drawing issues during the underpainting stage.  It may have actually reduced my stress!  I am usually teetering on the edge of being out of control because I go right into painting with full color.

B


Sunday, October 10, 2010

Thomas S. Buechner, 1926 - 2010

"Smoke"
Thomas S. Buechner

Tom is no longer with us, but his presence will be lasting. He has touched many, many people.  He had a long career as the head of the Corning Museum of Glass and was an active member of the community, but he especially touched the painters with whom he generously shared his passion.

West End Gallery is presenting an exhibit of his work, some previously unseen, and a tribute by artists who painted with him. Downstairs will feature his work, and upstairs with show work by over forty artists. The opening is Thursday, October 14 from 5-7:30 p.m.

"Smoke", shown above, will be included in the show. That darn cigar was always present, so I thought it appropriate. In addition, my painting of "Innkeeper's Doorknob" will be shown upstairs as part of the tribute to Tom.  He encouraged me to go ahead and paint the filigree detail, which was a challenge for me, and a door can be a metaphor.

"Innkeeper's Doorknob"
10 x 8 Oil


I am grateful I was able to spend time with Tom during the last year.  We became friends.  Our friendship started when I made his portrait for my In Their Studios photo essay, and then I took a painting workshop with him, which led to him inviting me to paint with him and Lin Gardner on Wednesday afternoons during what turned out to be his last six months.

He would work on his stuff while we worked on ours.  Some days when he didn't feel up to painting, he would read while we painted.


He has lots of rules -- don't ring the doorbell, don't track in winter slush on his refurbished studio floors, don't interrupt his nap, let him speak, stop at exactly 5 p.m.--- but we adapted easily.  The camaraderie more than made up for any conforming we had to do. 

We enjoyed feisty conversations about everything  -- from local politics -- to how best to help struggling artists we know --- to the "right" way to hold a paint brush  --- and how he should stop picking on the way Lin and I like to bring a lot of stuff with us to paint with him. He found my toothbrush holder for my paint brushes particularly peculiar.

I fondly remember one of our conversations.  We were sitting on his patio in the sun while he smoked his cigar and I showed him a group of photos I was considering for the basis of a new series of photographs, called Beyond The Path.  I was stuck and wanted his opinion. 


One of the images in the series was this tree  -- the Buechner tree next to his garage.  He said how intrigued he was that he had never observed it in this way.  And then, sarcastically said that he'd have to charge me for use of it!  So, I said I'd have to charge him back for some prints I had just made for him.  That was our banter.

What I will really miss about Tom is the opportunity to talk to him about what he thought of things.  In turn, I felt like he cared what I thought, which is a gift I will always appreciate.  But the more interesting thing to me is that he gave the same gift to hundreds of people.  He was very generous.

Tom in his studio






Saturday, October 9, 2010

Watkins Glen Study No. 10

Watkins Glen Study No. 10

Friday, October 8, 2010

Watkins Glen Study No. 9

Watkins Glen Study No. 9

Thursday, October 7, 2010

Watkins Glen Study No. 8

Watkins Glen Study No. 8

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Watkins Glen Study No. 7

Watkins Glen Study No. 7

Tuesday, October 5, 2010

Watkins Glen Study No. 6

Watkins Glen Study No. 6

Monday, October 4, 2010

Watkins Glen Study No. 5

Watkins Glen Study No. 5

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Watkins Glen Study No. 4

Watkins Glen Study No. 4

Saturday, October 2, 2010

Watkins Glen Study No. 3

Watkins Glen Study No. 3

Friday, October 1, 2010

Watkins Glen Study No. 2

Watkins Glen Study No. 2